Skip to Content

7 Best Climbing Hydrangea Varieties

Climbing hydrangeas are some of the most interesting plants. Today I will tell you about 7 popular varieties of this type of growth.

Hydrangea anomala subsp. petiolaris

best climbing hydrangea

Hydrangea anomala subsp. petiolaris

First on the list is Hydrangea anomala subsp. petiolaris. This is a very beautiful climbing hydrangea. It has large inflorescences of white flowers which are very visible against the dark green foliage. In fact, the leaves of this hydrangea are another ornamental feature.

This plant can grow over 30 feet tall! Of course, it will need a framework or something to hold on to. This hydrangea is usually less than 10 feet wide. With proper crown formation, you will get a beautiful green wall with large balls of white flowers.

This hydrangea is completely undemanding and can grow in almost any soil. Also, once it is established, watering is almost unnecessary. Its frost tolerance is excellent and it can withstand quite severe frosts and heat equally.

Hydrangea anomala subsp. petiolaris needs diffused sun or partial sun. With very much sun, the leaves can get burned or turn yellow. On the other hand, the full shade will not allow this hydrangea to reach its potential.

Miranda Climbing Hydrangea

best climbing hydrangea

Miranda Climbing Hydrangea

The next great climbing hydrangea is Miranda. This variety has medium-sized serrated leaves that are four inches long. They are distinguished by their variegation, which means that part of the leaf is green and the other part is yellow.

By planting this hydrangea in your garden, you will get beautiful light cream clusters of flowers against the yellow-green foliage. Add to that a climbing growth habit and you’re unlikely to find a more decorative plant.

Miranda can grow up to 50 feet tall. As in the previous case, it needs a framework to anchor itself and move upward. This hydrangea can grow up to 6 feet wide. You can easily control the shape and size of this plant by pruning and the size of the framework.

As for growing, Miranda needs full or partial shade, it does not tolerate full sun. In the heat, it needs watering at least once a week. The variety is fairly hardy and can grow from 4 to 8 USDA hardiness zone.

Silver Lining Climbing Hydrangea

best climbing hydrangea

Silver Lining Climbing Hydrangea

Silver Lining Climbing Hydrangea is just as beautiful as the previous variety with the difference that the leaves are not yellow-green but silver-green. The variegated vine hydrangea will be a highlight of any yard.

You can create a privacy screen from this hydrangea and get a very decorative look for the entire growing season. Silver Lining reaches 50 feet in height, which is more than enough to fence off your neighbors. If you want a long hedge, plant several of these plants 5 feet apart.

Silver Lining Climbing Hydrangea needs partial shade, it grows poorly in full shade and full sun. When planting, you need to use loose and well-drained soil. Avoid planting this hydrangea in heavy clay soil.

It is also worth remembering that any plant can fall prey to pests. So keep a constant eye on your hydrangea and, if there are many insects, spray it with an aqueous solution of garden oil.

Flying Saucer Climbing Hydrangea

best climbing hydrangea

Flying Saucer Climbing Hydrangea

Flying Saucer is a very interesting climbing hydrangea because of its inflorescences. The inflorescences of this hydrangea are almost flat and resemble saucers. When the Flying Saucer blooms it looks as if white flying saucers are flying against a background of bright green leaves. If you choose this variety for your yard, you will not be disappointed.

The Flying Saucer Hydrangea reaches a great height. Thanks to its aerial roots, it can reach 40-50 feet tall and 4-5 feet wide. It is a perfect candidate for creating a green wall or privacy screen.

The variety is absolutely hardy for most of the United States. Needs full or partial sun. The flowering period is the second half of summer. Needs watering and nutritious soil for fast growth and beautiful blooms.

Hydrangeas are generally abundant bloomers and the Flying Saucer is no exception. To replenish the energy the plant has used up for flowers, you need to fertilize it. Use a slow-release multi-purpose fertilizer. Fertilize for the first time in the spring before the buds open. The second time just after flowering, avoid fertilizing in late fall and winter.

Crug Coral Climbing Hydrangea

Crug Coral Climbing Hydrangea

Crug Coral Climbing Hydrangea

Crug Coral Climbing Hydrangea differs from previous cultivars in the color of its flowers. It has red flowers that turn pink in midsummer. It blooms in early summer and its bright clusters of flowers are very beautiful against the green wall.

It reaches a height of 40-50 feet and a width of 5 feet. After a few years of growing, you will have a unique plant that will look delightful when in bloom. But be aware that Crug Coral blooms on old wood, so avoid cutting it in autumn and spring otherwise you might lose some of the flowers. The best time to cut it is right after it blooms.

It is a very hardy plant and can grow almost anywhere in the US. But it does require a nutrient-rich and friable substrate as it does not tolerate stagnant moisture. Crug Coral needs full or partial sun. Water it as soon as the substrate is 1-2 inches dry.

Hydrangea serratifolia

hydrangea-serratifolia

Hydrangea serratifolia

Another climbing hydrangea is Hydrangea serratifolia. This interesting plant has glossy, leathery, dark green leaves. The flowers are light creamy and large with 4 petals. In fact, both flowers and leaves are very different from other hydrangeas, making them unique.

This hydrangea grows up to 30 feet tall with a width of 30 feet as well. It is a suitable plant for a low hedge because it grows quickly in width and does not shed its leaves in winter.

The disadvantage of this hydrangea is its poor hardiness. It is not recommended for growing north of zone 8. This is why it is not available to a large number of homeowners in the U.S.

On the other hand, it tolerates hot conditions and bright sun well. It can also tolerate a little drought, which is rare for hydrangeas.

Hydrangea seemannii

Hydrangea seemannii

Hydrangea seemannii

The last hydrangea with a climbing growth habit is Hydrangea seemannii. It has beautiful oblong green leaves and voluminous clusters of rather large white flowers. The flowering period is in late summer and at this time the plant looks delightful.

This hydrangea reaches a height of 35 feet and a width of 10 feet. You can create a beautiful hedge or get a very ornamental plant if you wish.

Lack of hardiness prevents this plant from being grown all over the United States. It is recommended that it be planted no more than zone 7 north.

Can tolerate almost all types of soil. Loves slightly moist soil. Can grow in full sun as well as shade.